Teapot

  • Category:

    Metals

  • Creator (Role):

    Hall, Boardman & Co. (Retailer)

    Henry S. Boardman (Maker)

    Franklin D. Hall (Maker)

  • Place of Origin:

    Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Mid-Atlantic, United States, North America

  • Date:

    1846-1848

  • Materials:

    Pewter; Wood

  • Museum Object Number:

    1964.1154


  • Complete Details



Object Number

1964.1154

Object Name

Teapot

Category

Metals

Credit Line/Donor

Bequest of Henry Francis du Pont

Creator (Role)

Hall, Boardman & Co. (Retailer)
1846-1848
After opening a successful shop in New York City (run by Timothy Boardman), Sherman and Thomas Danforth Boardman of Hartford set up another business in Philadelphia in 1844. It was initally called Boardman & Hall, and was run by Sherman's son Henry S. Boardman and Franklin D. Hall. The business was later known as Hall, Boardman & Company and finally Hall & Boardman. However, it appears that Henry worked alone for one year in 1845. For more on marks used by Hall, Boardman & Company, see Montgomery, History of American Pewter (1973), p.222 and C. Jordan Thorn, Handbook of American Silver and Pewter Marks (1949), p.259. See also Laughlin, Pewter in America (1981), vol.1, p.128-130 and vol.3, p.183; Carl Jacobs, Guide to American Pewter (1957), p.103; and J.B. Kerfoot, American Pewter (1942), p.138-140.

Henry S. Boardman (Maker)
1820-1895
Henry S. Boardman was the son of Sherman Boardman, nephew of Timothy and Thomas Danforth Boardman. After opening a successful shop in New York City (run by Timothy Boardman), Sherman and Thomas Danforth Boardman of Hartford set up another business in Philadelphia in 1844. It was initally called Boardman & Hall, and was run by Sherman's son Henry S. Boardman and Franklin D. Hall. The business was later known as Hall, Boardman & Company and finally Hall & Boardman. However, it appears that Henry worked alone for one year in 1845. For more on Boardman & Hall's marks, see Laughlin, Pewter in America (1981), vol.2, p.97 and 104; John Carl Thomas, Connecticut Pewter and Pewterers (1976), p.122-123; Montgomery, History of American Pewter (1973), p.217; C. Jordan Thorn, Handbook of American Silver and Pewter Marks (1949), p.242; Carl Jacobs, Guide to American Pewter (1957), p.38. See also Laughlin, Pewter in America, vol.1, p.128-130; Thomas, Connecticut Pewter, p.121-143; and J.B. Kerfoot, American Pewter, p.138-141.

Franklin D. Hall (Maker)
Franklin D. Hall was listed in the Philadelphia Directories as a pewterer in 1840. He worked for the Boardmans. After opening a successful shop in New York City (run by Timothy Boardman), Sherman and Thomas Danforth Boardman of Hartford set up another business in Philadelphia in 1844. It was initally called Boardman & Hall, and was run by Sherman's son Henry S. Boardman and Franklin D. Hall. The business was later known as Hall, Boardman & Company and finally Hall & Boardman. However, it appears that Henry worked alone for one year in 1845. For more on Boardman & Hall's marks, see Laughlin, Pewter in America (1981), vol.2, p.97 and 104; John Carl Thomas, Connecticut Pewter and Pewterers (1976), p.122-123; Montgomery, History of American Pewter (1973), p.217; C. Jordan Thorn, Handbook of American Silver and Pewter Marks (1949), p.242; Carl Jacobs, Guide to American Pewter (1957), p.38. See also Laughlin, Pewter in America, vol.1, p.128-130; Ebert, Collecting American Pewter (1973), p.133; Thomas, Connecticut Pewter, p.121-143; and J.B. Kerfoot, American Pewter, p.138-141.

Place of Origin

Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Mid-Atlantic, United States, North America

Origin Notes

The origin was previously identified as Hartford, Connecticut.

Date

1846-1848

Mark or Signature or Inscription or Label

1. Mark; Base, underside; "HALL./BOARDMAN/ & CO." stamped in rectangle with indented corners
2. Mark; Base, underside; "PHILAD" stamped in rectangle

Materials

Pewter; Wood

Dimensions (inches)

8.311 (H) , 10.126 (W)

Dimensions (centimeters)

21.11 (H) , 25.72 (W)

Object Description

Text available soon.

Bibliography and Bibliographic Notes

[Book] Montgomery, Charles F. 1973 A History of American Pewter.
Published: fig. 11-26, p. 188
[Article] Goyne, Nancy A. 1965 Britannia in America: The Introduction of a New Alloy and a New Industry. Winterthur Portfolio. (II): 160-196.
Published: fig. 35, p. 187