1962.0587 A, B Needlework Picture and Frame
  • 1962.0587 A, B Needlework Picture and Frame
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Needlework picture (Canvaswork picture)

  • Title:

    Fishing Lady

  • Category:

    Textiles (Needlework)

  • Place of Origin:

    Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, New England, United States, North America

  • Date:

    1745-1755

  • Materials:

    Wool; Silk; Linen; Oil paint; Canvas

  • Techniques:

    Embroidered, Woven (plain), Canvaswork, Painted

  • Museum Object Number:

    1962.0587 A


  • Complete Details



Object Number

1962.0587 A

Object Name

Needlework picture (Canvaswork picture)

Title

Fishing Lady

Category

Textiles (Needlework)

Credit Line/Donor

Bequest of Henry Francis du Pont

Place of Origin

Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, New England, United States, North America

Date

1745-1755

Materials

Wool; Silk; Linen; Oil paint; Canvas

Techniques

Embroidered, Woven (plain), Canvaswork, Painted

Construction Description

Hand-embroidered, hand-painted

Dimensions (inches)

17.125 (L) , 16.12 (W)

Dimensions (centimeters)

43.498 (L) , 40.945 (W)

Measurement Notes

Dimensions refer to area of needlework visible within frame.

Object Description

Web - 01/20/2016

This canvaswork picture was worked between 1745 and 1755 in Boston, Massachusetts using crewel yarns and silk threads on a linen canvas. A group of mid-18th-century Boston pastoral embroideries, known today as the "Fishing Lady" pictures, share similar motifs, and in many cases have a figure of a lady sitting by a pond, fishing or a lady spinning. In "Fishing Lady" embroideries other motifs surrounding her were inspired by a number of design sources, including a series of pastoral engravings by the French woman artist Claudine Bouzonnet Stella, her uncle Jacques Stella, hunting prints engraved by B. Baron, and paintings by John Wootton. Elements from each of these artist's designs can be seen repeated and combined in various ways in Boston embroideries, probably chosen by each embroiderer. The individuality of each arrangement is complimented by the skill of the needlewoman, making this group of embroideries quite appealing. This is a poorly worked Fishing Lady composition. The arms and face of the lady are rather crudely painted in oils.

Bibliography and Bibliographic Notes

[Book] Swan, Susan Burrows. 1976 A Winterthur Guide to American Needlework.
Published: p. 32, fig. 22
[Book] Ring, Betty. 1993 Girlhood Embroidery: American Samplers & Pictorial Needlework 1650-1850. I.
Discussion of fishing lady pictures, pp. 44-53
[Book] Parmal, Pamela A. 2012 Women's Work: Embroidery in Colonial Boston.
Similar: pp. 86-87, fig. 54